focal length: 50 mm
shutter speed: 1/100
aperture: f/2.8
ISO: 400
flash: none

I don’t think I’ve been shooting “point blank” much these days. So, here are a few up-close-and-personal shots that I love. Especially since they are of my kid who frequently gets bombarded with mommy kisses at this close range! Poor thing. As you may know, I love to shoot in front of our north-facing window because of the nice reflected light we get there. I particularly like the catchlights in her eyes from the window’s reflection that really lighten up those cavernous, dark brown eyes.

Normally, they look like this:

focal length: 50 mm
shutter speed: 1/100
aperture: f/2.8
ISO: 400
flash: none

For a child of this age, trying to convince her to look up by using words doesn’t work too well. I could very well just be saying “Your momma has a photography addiction and needs help,” which would elicit the same response. Nothing. I just grab anything that is near me (so I don’t have to get up) and shake it vigorously at a 45 degree angle from her eye level and shoot like mad. Voila! Eyes that don’t look empty and lifeless.

My catchlights are a bit on the large side due of the size of the window.  But because her eyes are so dark to begin with, I don’t mind it so much.  Generally, people prefer to see catchlights at the 10 o’clock or 2 o’clock position within the iris of the eye.  It seems to be more pleasing than highlights caught in a lower position or more central, which then competes with the pupil.  There are also many different types of catchlights.  For example, ring lights, single or multiple highlights.  Do you have any thoughts on catchlights?  Or perhaps some tips you would like to share on getting the catchlights you find most pleasing?

Why is she wearing a hoodie inside the house you might ask? I’ll show you tomorrow.

Laura is a Vancouver wedding and portrait photographer. Visit laurahana.com.